N Gauge

GROUPING WORKBENCH: General Items


Page  1  2  3  4  5  6

25 February 2016

Here's a comparison shot of the latest carriage conversion work, which involved taking apart a Graham Farish 4-wheel coach in S&DJR livery, and putting it back together with extra detailing.

The replacement six wheel 'Stove R' chassis really makes a difference - with quite a bit of extra detailing, as does the end detailing, roof vents, handrail, and even the sometimes barely-visible door handles.

The work took around a couple of months, in small stages, probably only an hour or so each evening.

Most of the parts were the same as for the prototype LSWR carriage conversion project (see the LSWR Farish Carriage Conversions thread) although in this case the original roof could be kept as this matched the original roof type, which was very close to Midland Railway designs.

See S&DJR Farish Carriage Conversion for the full story.

Carriage work

27 February 2016

After the tricky work on the now-6-wheel carriage, it's time to do a little easy wagon weathering. There are plenty in the stock box to chose from, after all.

The first job was to unload these two bolster wagons and replace their load with a new one. This is the 'before' shot, after work done several months ago to add the load and chains:

Rolling stock

Now they're carrying a single load stretched across both wagons - a nice-looking and prototypical long load that still manages to traverse even the tightest curves on the layout.

Rolling stock

Next up were six ordinary open wagons, a mixture of coal-carrying and general goods wagons. The yellow Jameson's is an old Minitrix example. The middle one is a new-style Graham Farish, and the one on the right is a Mathiesons:

Rolling stock

The other three are a Peco GW goods (no coal dust or dirt so more of a brown weathered staining), a Peco 5-plank coal wagon, and a Poole-era 7-plank that still looks pretty good with some coal dust over it.

Rolling stock

4 March 2016

The Dapol M7 is notoriously weak and lightweight. Results seem to be variable, with some models being almost okay while others can barely pull themselves up an incline, let alone two coaches.

This one is one of the latter, so I've added as much lead weight underneath as it could take. It's still pretty weak but I've wanted to add some detailing for quite a while. The first job was to remove the rear chassis.

Loco upgrade

Removing the rear chassis allows you to access the back screw. This and the front screw just in front of the first set of driving wheels will allow the bodywork to be removed.

Loco upgrade

Body off.

Loco upgrade

Some extra weight can be added in the dead space underneath the coal bunker, although this hardly helps to add weight where it really needs to be - over the driving wheels.

Loco upgrade

Remove the plastic coal load to reveal the empty bunker.

Loco upgrade

I also removed the front coupling to allow access to the buffer beam. The name of the game is renumbering, and the '37' has already been rubbed off very gently with a fibreglass pen.

Loco upgrade

Also in preparation is a very finely modelled crew from N Brass Loco. An undercoat of Prussian Blue is overlaid with Railmatch dark blue to add tone and uneveness to the colour.

Loco upgrade

As I'm modelling 1930, the loco number also needed an 'E' for Eastleigh. Once it was dry and protected with a couple of layers of satin varnish, I was able to add some dust and dirt, plus a little water staining from some sloppy refilling of the tank.

Loco upgrade

Then the coal was added, a full load for a day's station piloting duties.

Loco upgrade

Last of all, the crew and some appropriate tools were added.

Loco upgrade

The before and after shots don't entirely do the work justice. It looks better in real life, especially with the plastic-looking shine taken off the bodywork. You can just about see the extra loco numbering on the back of the bunker.

Loco upgrade

There's already another project on the workbench. A report will follow in due course.

2 April 2016

A smallish update this time because a couple of long-term workbench jobs still haven't come to a finish. While those progress in small steps every evening, there is usually also a batch of wagons being weathered at the same time.

A couple of recent second-hand purchases:

General work

Disguising a 1930s wagon with a tarpaulin to hide the fact that it was built around six years too late for my purposes.

General work

Two fairly shabby second-hand wagons that needed a lot of cleaning, the ropes 'tied' back down, and some weathering:

General work

Two more 'rescues':

General work

And another tarpaulin duo that needed a clean-up and re-tying down:

General work

One of my first purchases back in 2013 finally gets a light weathering:

General work

And now something different - testing corridor connectors for Barry Morton. They work pretty well, but attaching them to one coach only and a blanking plate to the other may not be suitable for tight radius curves. I have a couple of places like that, and derailments happened.

A good solution would be to have a half-connector on each coach and no glue in the middle so that they can slide against each other on the tightest curves. There's a lot of work to do on these Pullmans anyway, so that's another job for the future:

General work

Something I got a while ago as clearance stock, pre-assembled by Etched Pixels, this pre-Grouping LSWR horse box needed running boards and steps, plus vacuum pipes, a tidy up of the Maunsell Green paint and a repaint of the roof:

General work

General work

General work

Finished and lightly weathered:

General work

 

Page  1  2  3  4  5  6