GROUPING WORKBENCH: General Items


Page  <<  4  5  6  7   8

11 March 2018

After a couple of months of modelling silence, I started catching up with a bit of loco work.

But first, a catch-up from the end of last year...

This Class M7 loco had already been detailed and weighted to try and give it a bit more grip and power (March 2016). Unfortunately steam loco research can sometimes be a bit of a minefield. The running number chosen, No 49, turned out to be a long-frame variant, not the short-frame version that the Dapol model represents. So it had to be renumbered again and this time it would be the right number.

No 247 wasn't fitted for push-and-pull operations so this one will run on other passenger services (if I can ever find two coaches that it can pull up the incline unaided) or on shunting duties around Bournemouth West.

Loco work

Loco work

Now we're up-to-date with last year's completed work, it's time for this year's first project.

This one actually began a while ago (August 2016), with some filing work to help the body sit better on the loco. But with the loco prepared and working beautifully, it needed the BR Brunswick Green livery and lettering stripped off and a full repaint into SR Maunsell Green. Again this work was passed onto Ozymandias of the N Gauge Forum (he handled the wonderful lining work on Class T9 No 304 - see 16 February 2017 for those details and the Loco Gallery for the finished model).

The next few pictures are his work... of his work. The loco is a Urie Class N15 4-6-0, No 743 Lyonesse, and it's the one at the back, in grey.

Loco work

Here it's had its coat of green, plus the black parts too on body and tender (in the middle).

Loco work

The first copper piping has now been painted in, along with red buffer beam:

Loco work

And now the while lining goes on, double white bands with a centre black line:

Loco work

Loco work

The lining has been done, the outer white line has been painted black, the tender lettering has been added, and the while body and tender have been spray-varnished to seal it all in.

Loco work

Loco work

Ozymandias gave the completed loco a quick run on his test track to show it off properly.

Loco work

And then it was back on my workbench for some final detailing. The tender at the front of this shot (below) is the one for No 743 Lyonesse. I dug out the old coal as it had lost its natural shine during the spray-varnishing process. It came out surprisingly easily, giving me an almost empty tender that I could paint black and re-coal.

The tender for No 741 Joyous Garde just needed a bit of correctional work on the back coupler.

Loco work

Both locos, along with Class Z No 951 on the right, needed front coupler hooks and chains, while No 951 also needed a bit of extra pipe work added to its front buffer.

Loco work

No 743 received its nameplates - Lyonesse.

Loco work

Its tender was coaled up, but only enough to make it look like it had already done a shift in service.

Loco work

No 743 also had a few very diluted washed of frame dirt and roof dirt along the running plate, buffers, smokebox, cylinders, and cab roof. It wasn't really enough to show up that much, although the red of the buffer beam picked up a few stains. Some of those needed the edges scrapped off with a wet cocktail stick to make them less obvious. It was just enough to take the 'clean' out of the black to show a loco that had been out in the dust and soot of the railways in 1930.

Loco work

The red plaque had also been added to the cab sides, and the whistle just in front of the cab was now copper-coloured to match No 741.

Loco work

Loco work

A cab fall plate and crew had been added, the the fireman can be seen here, holding his shovel and looking towards the diminished coal load, probably calculating whether there was enough left to finish off the service they're working. Job done, I think.

Loco work

Loco work

Along with its hook and chains at the front, No 741 Joyous Garde also received the very first SR route indicator discs that I've done (from BH Enterprises). The route is Waterloo-Bournemouth and they seem to have worked out pretty well.

Loco work

5 June 2018

Things have been a little slow this year, but a few projects are gradually making their way through the various stages of construction. First of all was a rake of mineral wagons to compliment the single Mendip Mountain Quarries example that was produced last year (see 15 May 2017).

General work

The next project was a bit of a surprise. A chap called Simon Dawson has a kit-supplying 'shop' called Recreation21 on the Shapeways website (see external links). He's produced a 6-wheel SECR brake van in the lowest 3D printing quality, firstly for OO and O, but then also for N. Having such an unusual brake van design was too much to resist so I had to get one.

Here it is with a couple of undercoats and the beginnings of the red ends. The red goes on very reluctantly - I think the printing material was absorbing some of it despite the undercoats.

General work

The red needed three or four coats to look this good, but the oil-based SR brown went on in one go. Painting the red onto the internal door and end-panelling was also pretty tricky.

General work

Drilling out the tough material of the 3D print to create axle holes was also quite tricky work. It can't be done horizontally because the opposite axle bar gets in the way. So drilling is at about forty-five degrees and the wheels end up a bit higher up in the body than they should. My tip for anyone else doing this is to drill a little above (towards the rails) the guide holes for the axles - nothing more than a millimetre but that should do it. Then they'll probably be correct.

General work

Then I suddenly realised that I'd expected the bodywork to be complete, but it wasn't. So in went the 0.33mm brass handrails.

General work

Then I also needed to dig out a Peco coupling box and coupler for one end of the brake van, and a coupling hook, coupling chain, and lamp for the other end. The guard comes from Osborns.

General work

Two halves of a Peco wagon weight were pre-painted to match the inside of the van and were glued to either side panel where they wouldn't particularly show up when viewed normally.

General work

There's the coupling hook and chain, while the handrails had been undercoated at this stage.

General work

The handrails were whitened, the roof was stained with a bit of extra black, the lamp was added, and the transfers were added (tip for the next one - add a bit of extra gloss varnish for the transfer base as the normal amount wasn't entirely enough). Then the entire thing was dirtied with several thinned washes of grey and a couple of washes of frame dirt around the axles and running board.

A knock-on effect of having the wheels set a tiny bit too high in the body was that on the first running test on rails, the vertical bar on the Rapido coupler snagged in the rails as it crossed a set of points. It needed about a millimetre of it to be removed and the cut tip rounded off with a file.

And this is the finished version.

General work

27 August 2018

The first thing to do this time is finish off an old post. Back in the post for 16 February 2017 work started on a batch of Gramodels resin wagon bodies which were placed on Peco wooden wagon chassis. This is the belated view of the finished wagons. The covered wagon on the left is resin - part of the moulding. The wagon cover in the middle is made of a kind of tissue paper, which creases up quite well to look suitably 'tarpaulin-y'.

I still have more open wagons and some covered vans from Gramodels to do, and eventually I hope to get around to them.

General work

A couple of quick projects are next, in between longer projects which haven't been finished yet. These five wagons, plus one other that had already been weathered, were going to gain loads of Dapol lime. Unlike the earlier coal loads, these were to be glued straight in - mostly to save time.

General work

There's no need to cover the usual weathering process in detail. Here's the finished version, complete with lime loads (and no weather covering!). The already-weathered George Lovegrove wagon is at the rear, on the left.

General work

The only covered wagon there is at the back, and is totally hidden from view, so here it is. Hopefully that's enough weathering for 1930 without being the 'too much' weathering of post-Second World War wagons.

General work

The next project involved taking a couple of Peco bolster wagons. The bolsters were removed and the moulded details on the wagon bodies taken off.

General work

Then the bodies were painted in LMS wagon grey...

General work

...with some painting and weathering of the planks on top and suitable lettering and numbering added to the sides.

General work

The finished version is shown here, complete with container loads that are secured in place with strong ropes. This is how the early container traffic was moved around, starting from about 1928-1929. Pre-Grouping 1-plank wagons were used and, it seems from photos, they were largely ex-LNWR wagons. The dedicated conflat wagons that are produced by Peco didn't appear until about 1935, too late for a layout set in 1930.

General work

26 October 2018

This job took the best part of a year, with frequent breaks. I'd purchased a Brighton Terrier simply because it was in SR livery, as you do, but it didn't really fit in with my LSWR/SR Western Section layout theme.

A bit of research showed that the LSWR actually bought two Terriers from the LB&SC railway prior to the Grouping. They didn't really find a use for them though. One was sold off and the other spent much of its time in storage. That was also sold off in 1930 which means that I can justify running it, in 1929/1930, perhaps as a final test, placing it in minimal service before the SR decides whether it's worth keeping.

But the LSWR versions underwent some modification...

Terrier work

Off came the coal rails, steam reversing gear, and front steps. To be added was the metal plate in the centre of the photo, along with three staples.

Terrier work

The metal plate goes on top of the cab to simulate pull-and-push cable connectors which would have allowed the loco to be semi-controlled from the far end of the train when it was in 'push' mode.

Terrier work

The Dapol chimney also had to come off. The N Brass Loco replacement needed some trimming and filing at the base to provide a plug that would lock into the existing chimney base.

Terrier work

Chimney fitted, but in need of some more filing to match its size to the Dapol base. The cable gear on the cab roof now has its three staples to represent the cable guides.

Terrier work

The next go with the chimney looked much better (although the camera is rather cruel).

Terrier work

This picture also shows the sandboxes that were fitted over the front splashers, courtesy of N Brass Loco. The white lining is hand-painted, continued on from what was already on the splashers. A driver has been added and the frames and wheels have been weathered. It was impossible to find 'SOUTHERN' lettering that would fit onto the side tanks of the Terrier so I had to print my own.

Terrier work

That means removing the original lettering and numbers.

Terrier work

I wasn't happy with the quality of the print though. It's not the best print but I tried several attempts on plain paper before putting this onto decal paper. Then I tried painting over the poor parts of the decal to hide it. That just seemed to show up the poor quality of the lettering even more.

Terrier work

So these decals had to come off.

Terrier work

The next version used an original image that was twice the size and twice the resolution. It's still far from perfect but it'll do for this loco. The edges will need to be hand-painted to disguise the frayed edges. Real coal has been added to the bunker and the chimney now looks much better.

Terrier work

Because the real loco had been in storage for the best part of a decade before 1930, I felt justified in making it look pretty dirty and dingy, with the bonus that I could also hide the worst parts of the loco numbering and lettering.

Terrier work

That's the finished loco. Taking the body off the chassis several times has caused a problem or two of its own, as it now fits rather less well, and the motor seems to bump up against the smokebox end if the body doesn't sit well. It seems to go forwards pretty well after many tries but reverse is still a bit jumpy. Apart from that, it seems to fit the bill.

Terrier work

LSWR Terrier No 735 can be seen in the loco gallery here, operating on Bridgebury Gate.

 

Page  <<  4  5  6  7   8