N Gauge

GROUPING WORKBENCH: General Items


Page  1  2  3  4  5  6

31 December 2015

After a bit of a delay in getting around to it, the SR guards van was weathered and 'lamped', along with two others. This didn't take long at all, although removing one coupling on each of them did take a while. The older vans don't like releasing their couplers, so you have to use quite a bit of stubborn but gentle persuasion. They look much better without the coupling and with chains added.

Once the couplings were removed, the rest of the work was merely a matter of washing the body with diluted black paint and then frame dirt, and also dry-brushing with more frame dirt and a hint of brown. The roofs were washed over in several layers using Railmatch 'roof dirt', appropriately. Taking away the shiny plastic look of the roofs makes a big difference.

The tail lamps are from Springside Models, although the red light had to be painted on for a couple of them, and then gloss varnished afterwards.

The first of the brake vans had a very dark and shiny plastic roof, one of the worst I've seen. This was painted over several times and stained, but it doesn't come across very well in this slightly over-exposed photo. The second one in the photos below is the best of the bunch.

Grouping workbench

Grouping workbench

Grouping workbench

Next up was a bit of work on a Union Mills loco that's been in trouble ever since someone replaced the 'official' tender wire with something very thin that may not be able to handle the job. I had to replace the original wire.

Grouping workbench

That almost did the trick. It works much better now but every once in a while it will sit there when the power is applied and simply cause a short. Still, 'every once in a while' isn't necessarily that often...

Grouping workbench

17 January 2016

The next job on the workbench is to create the beginnings of a 1930 permanent way train.

A Parkside Dundas 20T sleeper wagon kit comes first. The original was built in 1928, so it'll be a modern vehicle for this train.

The kit parts:

Grouping workbench

Body assembled (although the instructions are confusing):

Grouping workbench

Sprayed in an undercoat grey and a topcoat bauxite:

Grouping workbench

Now it has been added to its chassis, and work begins on three single bolster wagons (on the left in the photo below), which will also be in bauxite but will carry S&DJR lettering (they were absorbed into the LMS and SR fleets in 1930).

On the right are three 1-plank fixed-side stone trucks, which will carry SR lettering and brown livery. All six of these are P&D Marsh metal kits that need Peco chassis, all of which are wooden solebar types in this case.

The 1-plank wagons are very well detailed (plankwise) and paint up well, but the bolster wagons are rougher and the detail harder to pick out.

Grouping workbench

Grouping workbench

SR decals are Modelmaster, and are very good - robust and easy to apply.

Grouping workbench

S&D decals are from Railtec, but they're fairly fragile.

Grouping workbench

And here's the lettered and lightly weathered sleeper wagon.

Grouping workbench

24 January 2014

Another project just finished is a brake van conversion. I've had this second-hand LNER brake van without a roof for quite a while, keeping it in case the chassis was needed. Instead, I realised that it bears a good similarity to some models of S&DJR brake vans of the 1870s and 1880s after they were converted and upgraded around the turn of the century.

The van I've selected is No 782A, in existence in 1930 but with no known photographic record of it in the twentieth century. A fuzzy photo of it before the upgrade shows enough similarities to make me confident that I'm on the right path. That gives me room to get it wrong without any rivet counters threatening to burn me at the stake.

The first step was to remove the side lookouts, as the S&D short wheelbase models don't seem to have had these.

Grouping workbench

Then start building up the outside framing and add filler panels for the lost lookouts:

Grouping workbench

Grouping workbench

Grouping workbench

A thin card roof and a scrap of plastic from the top of a congealed superglue bottle for a vent.

Grouping workbench

Then a couple of coats of grey paint:

Grouping workbench

Plus appropriate lettering and a tail lamp, with handrails painted black and a side rail added across the outside framing.

Grouping workbench

Various washes of paint across the roof to show its great age, and there will also be a little weathering done later. Not bad.

 

Page  1  2  3  4  5  6